New Insights into Cardiovascular Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiome

Monday, October 19
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (Central Time)
Location:
CE: 1.0
Level 2 (intermediate knowledge/experience)
Activity Code: 157642

This session will focus on the relationship between the gut microbiome and the development of CVD. New research suggests that certain foods/dietary patterns increase the production of TMAO by the gut microbiome and this increases CVD development and other metabolic dysfunction. A review of dietary patterns and nutrients that impact the gut microbiome and the risk for CVD will be presented.

Planned with the Committee for Lifelong Learning

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the role of the gut microbiome as it contributes to CVD
  • Describe the link between dietary intake and the production of TMAO and the metabolic consequences of increasing levels of TMAO
  • Identify dietary patterns and nutrients that impact the gut microbiome and increase the risk for CVD

Performance Indicator:

  • 8.3.6 Keeps abreast of current nutrition and dietetics
    knowledge and trends.
  • 8.1.2 Applies knowledge of food and nutrition as
    well as the biological, physical and social sciences in
    practice.
  • 4.2.6 Analyzes and synthesizes information and
    identifies new information, patterns and findings.

    Moderator(s)

  • New Insights into Cardiovascular Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiome -

    Stephanie Harris, PhD, RDN, LD

    Assistant Professor; Faculty Co-Lead – Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Wellness and Preventive Care Pathway

    Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

  • Speaker(s)

  • New Insights into Cardiovascular Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiome -

    Mark Brown, PhD

    Associate Staff – Department of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Sciences Director of Research – Center for Microbiome & Human Health

    Cleveland Clinic

  • New Insights into Cardiovascular Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiome -

    Joanne Slavin, PhD, RDN

    Professor

    Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota